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A Guide to Plastic-free Food Storage 0

plastic free fridge

There are all kinds of waste, from packaging to disposable everyday items, but often overlooked is food waste. How much of your weekly groceries end up in the trash (or compost) before they ever got a chance to be consumed or used? Most of us would say that it's an embarrassing amount, and considering all the energy that goes into food production, it's key that we put a stop to unnecessary food waste.
 
However, is it possible to effectively store food without plastic? Won't our carrots go floppy and our salad wilt?
 
It is. It is completely possible to store your food in a way to decrease food waste without resorting to plastic.
 
Here are some simple rules that you can implement to get started:
 

  • Only store the things that need to be in the fridge there.

 

Otherwise make space on the counter for produce that does better at room temperature. Here is a break down of what should go where: 

 

Fridge Counter
Citrus Fruit melons
Berries apples
grapes mangoes
bell peppers pears
 carrots tomatoes
 celery plums
  squash
 
  • Use Water to Your Advantage

Just like you put flowers in a glass of water and on your counter, there are herbs and vegetables that need the same, like cilantro or kale. Others, like carrots and celery do best in water, but in the fridge. Some lettuces and leafy greens like spinach are best stored in damp tea towels or a Swag, and in the fridge.
 

  • Do NOT Refrigerate Bread!

There are two things people are worried with when it comes to bread. First of all, that it will develop mould, which most often actually happens when stored in plastic, and secondly, that it goes stale. People have battled these problems in the past by storing bread in the fridge which is actually the most drying thing you can do to it. Bread needs to breathe in order to not develop mold, so a bread bag and then a dark cupboard or bread box would be the best option. If you know that you will not be able to get through the whole loaf before it gets stale, preslice it and freeze it, toasting or defrosting a slice at a time as needed.
 
  • Ripen and then Refrigerate

Have you ever bought avocados just to have them all ripen at once at the counter and there's no way that you will be able to get through them before they start going bad? Once avocados achieve ripeness, store them in the fridge until you are ready to eat them.
 
  • Seal the Deal

If you only use half a lemon or avocado at a time, you only really need to cover the part that is exposed. Use a beeswax wrap to seal it, or just place face down onto a plate and place in the fridge.

 

  • Segregate the Ripe and Ready

Did you know that fruits and vegetables naturally emit a gas when they ripen to signal to neighbouring fruit to start doing the same? That's great in the wild or in a farming environment, but not necessarily in your fruit bowl. If you want to keep all of your fruit from reaching peak ripeness too soon, isolate the ones that are ripe and eat them as soon as possible.
 
  • Use the Crisper

Some things can be stored loosely in your crisper, like cabbage, spring onions and eggplants.

 

  • Don't Pass Over the Freezer

When you notice that your food is coming to the end of its usable life, freeze it! Veggies can be chopped up and used in stews, stirfrys, and casseroles, while frozen fruit is ideal for smoothies, jams, and baked goods. Otherwise, cook something with them to be eaten or frozen, like quiches, pot pies, or filling soup stock. Instead of plastic baggies, consider (re)zip bags, sturdy jars, or glass containers.
 

 

Minimizing food waste doesn't have to be complicated- it's all about forming habits like meal planning, proper storage, and finding creative use for scraps and food that's about to expire. 

 

How do you deal with this issue?
 

 

image credit: Jessie May

The Pains of Living Plastic Free and How to Fix It 0

shopping plastic free

Who likes the idea of living plastic free?

 

If you're here, it's likely that you do.

 

Plastic has an obvious detrimental effect on the environment, but also has been researched to have a negative influence on our health. It was seen as a "wonder product" when it was first discovered, and only now we are fully understanding the consequences of using it to the degree that we do.

 

However, getting rid of plastic in your life, or at least single-use plastic, is a much taller order than you would initially think. So many foods are packaged in plastic film, the entire frozen food aisle is covered in it, and even normal household products are most readily available in plastic from cleaners, to garden soil, even kids' toys.

 

While just making a conscious effort to choose plastic-free can make a big change in your lifestyle, there are lots of "sticking points" that are thorns in our sides. Here are some common problems we find that people struggle with and how we can get past that.

 

Plastic Packaging at Grocery Stores

This is one that we know is a killer for many, especially in seasons when farmers' markets and stalls are not an option. While in the harvest months, shopping package-free from farmers or producers can greatly decrease your plastic wrapping, there aren't as many options in conventional grocery stores. There's often one kind of cucumber and it comes in plastic, or the peppers on sale are the quad-pack that come in a plastic bag.

 

The most we can do in the winter is choose plastic-free when possible, or shop at smaller stores that make un-packaged goods available to their customers. In the warmer months, we can shop from producers, pick our own produce (berries, beans, fruit, etc.), or grow your own. Items like bread can be picked up from bakeries and many other pantry staples can be bought in bulk. Bring your clean jars and bulk bags to your local bulk or refill shop, or else Bulk Barn.

 

Of course, remember to bring your own produce and shopping bags to avoid the single-use plastic bags!

 

Meat  and Deli

These usually come packaged in plastic for freshness, but you can ask for them to be put in your container if there is a designated counter at your store. Bring your own rezip bags or reusable containers, ask for them to be tared and then filled with the fresh meat or deli meat of your choice. The same goes for seafood and cheeses. Many farmers' market vendors will also allow you to do this, though they won't advertise it.

 

Take Out Meals

This takes some research- some restaurants won't put their meals in your containers for fear of "contamination" or some other legality. A lot of the time it's about the inconvenience on their end. If you don't want to be disappointed when you arrive, call before hand and ask this restaurant if they will use your containers as you are trying to minimize waste.

 

When they do allow it, make sure that you communicate your appreciation and support them on social media, within your friend circle, etc., so that more restaurants feel motivated to do the same. If you are feeling especially frustrated and know that this fast food restaurant serves their "for here" customers on reusable plates, order it that way and transfer it to your container yourself. Sure the plate is dirty, but it will get washed, not thrown into the landfill.

 

Cleaners

Though this is changing, even a lot of "natural" household cleaners and detergents come in plastic jugs, bottles, or containers. From dishwasher tabs, laundry detergent, to scouring powder, many of these are now available package free or as refills at specialized eco or "refillable" shops. Now you can reuse those containers hundreds of times or refill a dedicated glass one. Otherwise, make them yourself from bulk ingredients! Baking soda and vinegar can get you very far, are cheap, and readily available.

 

Body and Skin Care

You'll be surprised what you can refill on nowadays, from shampoo, body lotion, nail polish remover, witch hazel, oils, and more! Companies are starting to let their stockists offer refill options, and there is more interest in making your own clean options from simple ingredients. Others run their own container recycling programs where your product containers are sterilized and reused down the line. It takes some research and some time, but many find this switch very satisfying. If a refill center is not accessible to you or you are lacking in time, always choose glass or reusable containers over ones that cannot be repurposed in any way or properly recycled. 

 

 

 

If we really want to see a shift in the way that plastic is used in our society we need to ask for it. Voice your displeasure, write letters to the store managers, support small businesses that are making the changes, and make those "strange requests" when ordering food, products online, and more. It will be uncomfortable, but it's what will make employees, owners, and policy makers stop and think.

 

At Mrs. Greenway we are increasing our refill options because we see that you are using them! For businesses, it's often a risk to make these changes, but seeing that people are voting with their dollars and voicing their appreciation, makes them more comfortable investing in a shift towards more sustainable living! Stay tuned on more news on our refillery, and in the meantime, if you have any specific requests, feel free to email info@mrsgreenway.ca.

 

 

What do you struggle with or what "hack" has helped you? Comment and let us know!