Eco-Lover's Take on Greeting Cards

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wilder greeting card

While you might feel like you can get away with just posting a cute family photo on Facebook rather than send a card to all your family and friends for Christmas, Valentine's Day still requires at least a few little notes, especially if you still have school aged children.
 
However, if you are striving towards the zero waste lifestyle, is buying a greeting card against your eco-morals?
 
Everyone has their own view on this topic, ranging from a strict ban and transition to digital e-cards, while others are willing to bend the rules to make a meaningful and timeless gesture.
 
I mean, all in all, it's just paper and totally recyclable, right?
 
Yes and no.
 

PLASTIC SLEEVE

 
Many greeting card/envelope combos come wrapped in a plastic sleeve that is to protect them from getting dirty or separated. While practical, it's not a recyclable type of plastic, and it's better to stay away from this kind of card wrapping. Some companies offer a compostable sleeve, so look for that or nothing at all.

 

BLING 

While some cards might capture your attention with cute addition of glitter, confetti, foil, or metallic writing, do your best to resist. These additions render your card non-recyclable and it will inevitably end up in the landfill.
 

SUSTAINABLY HARVESTED

 
All papers are not created equal. Look for stamps certifying that your card is made from sustainably farmed and harvested wood. This can put your mind at ease that you are not directly contributing to deforestation and biodiversity loss.
 

POST-CONSUMER RECYCLED PAPER

 
One step up is paper that is at least in part made of recycled paper. This uses fewer new resources and creates a market for recycled goods, giving them more value.
 

PLANTABLE PAPER

 
Some companies even go the extra mile and encourage people to compost the paper in their own gardens by using "seed paper", that you can bury and get plants out of. Or give something other than paper like with Gift-A-Green where you gift a package of microgreen seeds that can be directly sown in the pouch and then eaten!
 

EXTRA MISSION

 
Research your greeting card companies. Some of them have a pledge to plant a tree for every x number of cards they sell or do something else to offset the effect of their business on the environment. For example, Wilder, which we carry in stores, makes their cards using 100% renewable energy in addition to putting strict restraints on themselves in terms of sustainable paper, ink, and packaging.
 

DIY

 
Over the years you have surely collected enough cards and craft supplies that you can give a new life to items in your home and transform them into unique signature cards. This way, you avoid the plastic sleeves, you can control the "recyclability" of your creation, and you're already extending the time something stays out of the landfill.
 
 
 
 
So what are you doing this Valentine's Day and the sweet words you want to share with your love? Will you pen them down in a greeting card?
 
 
Happy Valentine's Day to all!
 

Mrs.Greenway

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Comments 1
  • Jessie
    Jessie

    I always come back to this question around holiday time especially with kids in school. Another option we’ve landed on is to find cards at thrift stores. They often have unused packages of Christmas and Valentine’s cards

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